dapperQdapperQ http://www.dapperq.com transgressing men’s fashion Sun, 22 May 2016 23:13:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Hot Rabbit's Queer Prom 2016 Was All Dapper and Shine! http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/hot-rabbits-queer-prom-2016-dapper-shine/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/hot-rabbits-queer-prom-2016-dapper-shine/#respond Sun, 22 May 2016 23:13:46 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27836 Prom is political. It is a rite of passage that ushers youth into a new phase of heteronormativity. Every fiber of prom can perpetuate...

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Prom is political. It is a rite of passage that ushers youth into a new phase of heteronormativity. Every fiber of prom can perpetuate hierarchies: classism, sexism, oppressive beauty expectations, racism, etc. The cool kids.  The captain of cheerleeding squads and football teams. Limos that only a few can afford. Dress codes mandating that girls wear dresses and boys wear suits. Policies that ban anyone except from heterosexual cis-gender couples from attending. This list goes on and on. Don't believe us? Just check out this story out of PA, where a girl was kicked out of her prom for wearing a tux!

But, some brave souls are turning prom on its head. Recently, Florida's oldest high school crowned its first same-sex couple as prom king and queen. And then there's Hot Rabbit, a New York City LGBTQ event production company that has been hosting annual queer proms to provide the LGBTQ community with a safe space to redefine and celebrate our own, more inclusive versions of prom. dapperQ was proud to sponsor the Hot Rabbit Bad Habit 2016 Queer Prom photo booth. All of the night's dapper magic was captured by celebrity photographer Maro Hagopian. Shine bright like a diamond! This is YOUR prom!

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Follow Hot Rabbit on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

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New Gender Neutral Footwear Line MATRIARCH Launches Kickstarter http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/new-gender-neutral-footwear-line-matriarch-launches-kickstarter/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/new-gender-neutral-footwear-line-matriarch-launches-kickstarter/#respond Thu, 12 May 2016 02:19:38 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27673 A Berlin/NYC-based sister-duo has teamed up to launch MATRIARCH, a new gender neutral footwear line offering masculine and androgynous styles in a wider range...

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A Berlin/NYC-based sister-duo has teamed up to launch MATRIARCH, a new gender neutral footwear line offering masculine and androgynous styles in a wider range of sizes. Check out their Kickstarter campaign to learn more about their story and design process:

Tired of the inadequate 'menswear' imitations for women, the masterminds behind MATRIARCH began designing 'menswear' inspired shoes in smaller sizes, but without all of the silly frivolous 'feminizing' details that they didn’t want. They simply wanted the same quality.

MATRIARCH also believes in sustainability which is why the shoes are made exclusively from vegetable-tanned leather. Vegetable-tanned leather is leather that is colored using tree bark tannins, resulting in a natural look and feel.

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There are four styles: two low-cut shoes inspired by the classic Longwing Brogue style, and two boots that express an understated elegance through simple but high-quality construction and materials. The leather soles have a stacked leather heel, and the zigzag soles are made from a durable Vibram rubber.

For more MATRIARCH, visit their website or follow them on Instagram. Oh, and definitely support their Kickstarter if you want to see more queer owned and operated independent shoe companies!

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Girl Kicked Out of Prom for Wearing Suit http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/girl-kicked-prom-wearing-suit/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/girl-kicked-prom-wearing-suit/#comments Tue, 10 May 2016 04:20:01 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27667 Just a few days ago, dapperQ praised Teen Vogue for publishing prom dress alternatives in their article “The Prom Dress Is Dead — Here’s...

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Just a few days ago, dapperQ praised Teen Vogue for publishing prom dress alternatives in their article “The Prom Dress Is Dead — Here’s How to Wear a Suit Better Than the Boys,” which offered some incredible masculine, tomboy, and andro prom inspo. Our excitement about this  mainstream support of greater freedom of gender expression for youth was quickly soured when we recently learned that Aniya Wolf, a high school student at Bishop McDevitt High School in PA, was asked to leave her prom for wearing a tuxedo.

The school provided the following statement to ABC news:

"The dress code for the prom specified girls must wear formal dresses. It also stated that students who failed to follow the dress code would not be admitted. The full dress code policy was sent to parents about three months ago. A reminder was sent to all students on March 6. On Friday afternoon, when it was brought to the attention of the school administration that a female student was planning to wear a tuxedo, we contacted her mother in hopes we could resolve the situation. It’s important to note that students who haven’t adhered to the dress code in past years haven’t been admitted to the prom."

 
Got something to say to Aniya's school? Here's how to reach them:
Address: 1 Crusader Way, Harrisburg, PA 17111
Phone: (717) 236-7973

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Wildfang to Donate 10% of Sales to Planned Parenthood During National Women's Health Week http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/wildfang-donate-10-sales-planned-parenthood-national-womens-health-week/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/wildfang-donate-10-sales-planned-parenthood-national-womens-health-week/#respond Tue, 10 May 2016 03:50:43 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27658 Since July 2015, 12 states have taken action to defund Planned Parenthood, threatening access to affordable healthcare and women’s rights everywhere. In honor of...

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Since July 2015, 12 states have taken action to defund Planned Parenthood, threatening access to affordable healthcare and women’s rights everywhere. In honor of National Women’s Health Week (May 8-15th), Wildfang asked 12 women to strip down and send a message to the politicians from those 12 states. The result is brave, bold and intimate.

“We felt strongly about this issue and couldn’t just stand by and watch as state after state attacked women’s rights. Attacking Planned Parenthood attacks us all. Affordable healthcare is a basic human right and every woman should have the right to choose her future and control her own body,” said Emma Mcilroy, Wildfang CEO.

During National Women’s Health Week, 10% of all purchases at Wildfang will be donated directly to Planned Parenthood.

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Community Voices: Interracial Dating While Queer & Woke http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/community-voices-interracial-dating-woke/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/community-voices-interracial-dating-woke/#comments Mon, 09 May 2016 04:00:03 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27653 Why do woke Black folk date white people? Why do I? Or rather how can I? As I scream Black Lives Matter on the...

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Why do woke Black folk date white people? Why do I? Or rather how can I? As I scream Black Lives Matter on the streets, the phone I hold in my hand is illuminated with a notification: a text from a white girl.

I feel the gaze of white men constantly. They size me up in my office. They refuse to move for me (and mostly everyone else) on the train. The chauvinist in them that insists on opening doors for women quickly devolves into the pompous racist who lets doors slam in my face. Maybe it is in spite of them that I seek out white women. I've always seen the way they ravenously and disgustingly allow their eyes to travel at leisure over women that have been in my company. Eyes that turn from longing to anger when they see who she is with: me.

Historically in America, Black men have been painted as brutes, as strong working bulls who do so well in the fields because they are essentially animals. You wouldn't want an animal around your women. The fear of the white man, a savage, a sambo could be lusted after by someone who should only have eyes for them? Impossible.

Despite all of the damage that white men have done for centuries both to Black men and arguably much worse to Black women, we have bitten back. Interracial couples exist in spite of racism and twisted ideology.

But why do Black men often allude that dating a white girl as the true sign that you've made it? As Kanye said: "...and when he get get on he leave your ass for a white girl." Thus making a commentary that a Black woman is perfect for you when you're struggling but as soon as you've met success, it's on to the next, the step up, the white woman. Black women's bodies have long been seen as disposable. When they are being spotlighted by white folks it is in a fetishized manner. Black women are either high sex or the help, not the CEO, the lawyer, or the banker. If they're a mother, it's probably of multiple babies, all of whom have different daddies. She is the brunt of every story-line on Maury, where we turn a Black women's true pain into an hour of comedy.

We watch as men celebrate not being a baby's father. They dance off of stage high-fiving anyone who will give them a hand. We as the audience are led to celebrate with him, to see this woman as a slut, while he is the lucky bastard who gets to leave this messy situation. We show her no remorse. We don't take a moment to delve into the system that she was raised in, the system he was raised in, one that never told her that her body mattered. One that was devoid of the white feminist cries of empowerment. And he looking for high fives in the audience is hearing the words of many rappers. How fatherhood is entrapment, that "these hoes ain't loyal." The cycle goes on, and the white supremacist system wins.

I was recently talking to one of my good friends, a femme QPOC about our attraction to white women and how as we got older, and more "woke" our distaste with much of the queer white community grows. And so, we had made a commitment to start actively trying to date more POC. She had just been on a date with an entrepreneur; a highly accomplished Black woman who had her own business was seemingly brilliant, breathtaking, and cool as fuck. This person personified #blackexcellence and yet - my friend wasn't sold.

She seemed perplexed as to why. As we dove further into it, some things began to become clear to both of us. She was in many ways intimidated by this woman. As a Black woman herself she could very easily see herself in her and vice versa. I had experienced similar while living in Oakland and dating politically righteous unapologetically Black femmes.

When we date POC as POC we are in many ways confronting ourselves. We are comparing - we are looking in a mirror. We are magnifying our own personally strengths and our flaws. If a Black woman similar in age who was given or exposed to similar opportunities and was living in the same city as she is, what was her excuse for not being as "good" or as successful.

Many of the white women I've dated have chalked me as a cause worth helping. A Black trans man, who was adopted by white folks, whose mom died as a teen, and who has family "issues". What I once saw as maternal nurturing from those I dated, I've grown to see as internalized white guilt. Something seen similarly when white teachers work in lower income minority communities or when they "volunteer" across the continent of Africa.

Does that mean every white woman I've ever dated has done so from some colonial delusion? No. But has it arisen in our relationship dynamics? Yes.

~

In this series I will be bringing in the voices of QPOC of all gender identities and white or white passing folks who date POC. If you know anyone who would like to contribute or would like to contribute yourself please send me an email at info@dapperQ.com with the subject Ryley: QPOC.

 
*dapperQ's Community Voices is a platform for and by the community to share stories, opinions, and essays. We embrace diverse points-of-view and welcome you to join the discussion in the comments section below, on Twitter, or by pitching your own pieces for publication via dapperQ@gmail.com

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Teen Vogue Features Prom Suit Alternatives http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/teen-vogue-features-prom-suit-alternatives/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/teen-vogue-features-prom-suit-alternatives/#respond Sun, 08 May 2016 04:00:56 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27637 As a style blogger, I receive free subscriptions to a wide variety of fashion magazines. I wasn't entirely sure how or why Teen Vogue...

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As a style blogger, I receive free subscriptions to a wide variety of fashion magazines. I wasn't entirely sure how or why Teen Vogue ended up sending me free magazines, but I must admit that their recent content has been impressive, including discussions about cultural appropriation, editorials featuring androgynous models, and their most recent article, "The Prom Dress Is Dead — Here's How to Wear a Suit Better Than the Boys," which offered some incredible masculine, tomboy, and andro prom inspo. Check out some of their lewks below. (Photos by Stevie + Mada.)

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QTPOC Hot Dog Stand in the Works! http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/qtpoc-hot-dog-stand-works/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/qtpoc-hot-dog-stand-works/#respond Sat, 07 May 2016 17:25:11 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27633 Transgender people face high rates of workplace discrimination and harassment; unemployment; economic insecurity; and homelessness. The 2009 National Transgender Discrimination Survey by the National...

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Transgender people face high rates of workplace discrimination and harassment; unemployment; economic insecurity; and homelessness. The 2009 National Transgender Discrimination Survey by the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force revealed the following key findings:

  • Double the rate of unemployment: Survey respondents experience unemployment at twice the rate of the population as a whole.
  • Near universal harassment on the job: Ninety-seven percent (97%) of those surveyed reported experiencing harassment or mistreatment on the job.
  • Significant losses of jobs and careers: Forty-seven percent (47%) had experienced an adverse job outcome, such as being fired, not hired or denied a promotion.
  • High rates of poverty: Fifteen percent (15%) of transgender people in our sample lived on $10,000 per year or less–double the rate of the general population.
  • Significant housing instability: Nineteen percent (19%) of our sample have been or are homeless, 11% have faced eviction and 26% were forced to seek temporary space.

Facing these realities, model and transgender blacktivist Ryley Rubin Pogensky has decided to forge his own path towards greater economic security. Ryley is transforming his love of hot dogs into his own business: His very own QTPOC owned and operated hot dog stand. I mean, makes total sense. If you follow Ryley on the gram at @inbetweenthebun, you'll see firsthand that he's spending most of his hard earned money feeding his hot dog addiction. Only now, he'll be at the helm as a QTPOC entrepreneur and serving as a role model for others to create their own employment opportunities outside the traditional workforce.

Ryley states:

"I'm sick of having to explain my gender in job interviews. I'm tired of knowing that my stock literally drops when a hiring manager sees my skin color. I'm over having to guess if my resume is shiny enough to deter from all of the unasked questions about who and why I exist the way I do.

I have always lived to bring people together and make people happy. That's it. That's my life goal. One of the things that brings me exponential happiness is food. Food has always been something that has brought humans together. With food comes conversation, and with conversation come ideas, new friends, and new possibilities. We all have a food, a snack, a decadent dessert, a secret adoration, a nostalgic bite. My food of foods has always been hotdogs.

And now. I'm going to serve them on my terms."

To support Ryley's efforts, donate to his GoFundMe crowd sourcing project here.

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Fashion Rocks: Music and Style with Dinah Thorpe http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/fashion-rocks-music-style-dinah/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/fashion-rocks-music-style-dinah/#comments Wed, 04 May 2016 04:00:32 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27608 Welcome back to Fashion Rocks, a series that celebrates dapper musicians across the globe. This week we're featuring Dinah Thorpe, a Toronto-based music writer...

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Welcome back to Fashion Rocks, a series that celebrates dapper musicians across the globe. This week we're featuring Dinah Thorpe, a Toronto-based music writer and producer who is also currently moonlight as a butch model. Interview and images by Jack Jackson of alljackedup.

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dapperQ: When did you start performing – and what or who were your early passions and influences?

Dinah: I have been performing live since 2008. Sometimes I perform alone and sometimes with other musicians. I had nightmares every night for two weeks before my first show. Eight years later, performing doesn’t terrify me as much as it used to, though I do still wrestle with the discomfort of putting my voice, my body, and innermost feelings on display for people.

I grew up on folk music, Motown 45s, and CBC (our NPR). The first tape I bought was Boyz II Men “Cooleyhighharmony,” and the second was Ace of Base. Michael Jackson, The Indigo Girls, and Portishead were very important to me in high school. These days I listen to a lot of different kinds of music, and I think it shows in my work.

dapperQ: How has your work evolved?

Dinah: I feel like both by doing this work and by constantly studying other people’s, I have improved both as a songwriter and as a producer. But I suppose if I didn’t feel that way eight years in I wouldn’t still be at it. I think I can hear the influence of jazz coming into my work now (in the harmonies, much less linear structures, and weirder time signatures), and trip hop for sure (in the textures and pace).

I feel like I have figured out how to express myself with the tools and skills that I have, for now. There are days when I feel my work is shit, and that perhaps I am, and on those days you have to leave the studio and find something else to do. Or just bang on the drums for a while. And then come back and start something new. I always have at least two songs on the go at once, so if I get stuck with one or don’t like where it is going I can leave it for a while. Being an artist seems to require finding a balance between being hard on yourself and being amazed with yourself. Or maybe that is just life for everyone.

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dapperQ: How would you describe your current musical style?

Dinah: I find this question next to impossible to answer. I sing a lot, and layer my vocals. I also make beats. I use acoustic instruments and electronic ones. You can dance to some of my work, but in more of a slow dirty way rather than a fast hyper way. Sometimes I have a lot to say and then I try to rap. My music is definitely alternative, which to me just means it doesn’t sound like mainstream things, and also that I am very queer and so of course my work is too.

dapperQ: Where are you based out of? Do you feel that your city/region influences your style? If so, how?

Dinah: I live in Toronto, where it is hot in the summer and snowy in the winter. I like having seasons, and they definitely influence my work. When I am writing, I stare out my window a lot and sometimes end up writing about trees or squirrels. I also write lyrics outside a lot in seasons other than the winter, and sometimes in beautiful places when I get the chance to travel. In the winter I tend to get more recording and arranging done because it is not fun to be outside. On a smaller scale, I think my little studio influences my writing too. It sounds really lovely in here and I am sure its size and shape affect what comes out of it.

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dapperQ: What other artists are inspiring you right now?

Dinah: Tricky. The XX. Tracy Chapman. Lapsley. Lisa LeBlanc. The Buffy Ste. Marie and A Tribe Called Red collaboration “Working for the Government.” TR/ST. Alejandra Ribera’s “La Boca.” Kim Harris’s “The Weight of it All.” Cat Power’s “Hate.” Nina Simone, as always. Her version of “Trouble in Mind” is so cheerful that you can almost pretend it is not about lying down on the railroad tracks.

dapperQ: Music and fashion have always been intertwined. Some of the biggest style icons have come from the music industry, from Gaga, Bowie, Madonna and Beyonce to Andre 3000, Joan Jett, Pharrell, and the Beatles. On the runway, the perfect song has the power to convey the aesthetic of a designer’s work. Alternatively, the perfect outfit or personal style has the power to convey the aesthetic of a musician’s work. How would you describe your personal style when it comes to fashion? Would you say it is influenced by your music? If so, how?

Dinah: Interesting question. And yes I think the two things are entwined—the styling of yourself and the styling of your artistic work. Not just musicians but artists of all kinds, and maybe especially those of us who are performers of art as well as makers of it. People end up either choosing to or having to look at us a lot. So the way we present ourselves I guess becomes an act of art-making. Not that there aren’t days when I throw on whatever is on top of the pile or least stinky, because there are those days too.

I have begun thinking about style and fashion only recently in any kind of concentrated way. I guess it is part of a larger process of figuring out and becoming comfortable with who I am and what I look like. For a long time, I think I tried to blend in, and was pretty unsuccessful at it because of my height and my gender expression. Lately, I am attempting to embrace the fact that I tend to get noticed, even though some kinds of attention are more welcome than others. I don’t mind curiosity or desire, but confusion and disgust can be hard to take.

Buying clothes has always been fraught for me, because it is nearly impossible to find clothes that I like, that fit me, that I can afford, and that I feel okay about ethically. It’s a wonder I find anything to wear! More often I just leave stores sad and exhausted and determined to open my own store called “soft butch” or “somewhere in between” or something to that effect. I love clothes and I could spend a lot of money on them if I had it and if there were stores that sold what I like to wear. But for me it is all intertwined—being genderqueer, being an artist, being creative and resourceful, using my imagination in what I wear, how I look, and how I live my life.

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dapperQ: Has your clothing style evolved over the years?

Dinah: My clothes have always had to be functional, and they still definitely are. I like to move around a lot, I ride a bike everywhere, and always seem to be fixing something dirty or carrying something heavy. So my clothes have to be able to do that stuff with me. But I am also paying more attention to what I wear these days. Because if I am already a spectacle I might as well try to be fabulous.

I have an office job part-time and so I have had to assemble a wardrobe for that that is stylish and comfortable and also presentable. For those of us who exist on unusual places along the gender spectrum, office wear can be both a challenge and an adventure.

dapperQ: Who are some of your fashion icons?

Dinah: The queers I know. The artists I know. Fabulous people I see in Kensington Market or on Dundas West. I like some men’s fashion right now. I feel it is the first time I have consciously taken my cues from there—skinny rolled-up jean shorts, skinny jeans, drop-crotch pants, long tank tops…But I also like high glam sometimes too, and have been known to pull out a shoulder-padded sparkled blazer that could have been worn by either Bowie or your grandmother.

dapperQ: What is the one article of clothing you cannot live without?

Dinah: Sneaker boots. The lovechild of two of my greatest loves.

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dapperQ: What can we expect next from you?

Dinah: Right now I am working on this fashion show called Superbutch, happening May 14 in Toronto. It's part of Mayworks labour arts festival, and I am working on it with Heather Blom and Jack Jackson of alljackedup. The concept has opened up a space for having a conversation around female masculinity and transmasculinity, and the relevance of butch as an identity category in 2016. And its race and class and cis and colonial histories too. People have really come forward to be part of the event and that is really great and unfamiliar for me. I feel like I often work in a bubble, so it is really fun having a team.

Once that show is done I look forward to getting hot and heavy with writing music again. I haven’t had time for it in a couple of months and, as my friends and family will attest, that makes me a rather grumpy person. I feel another album coming on so that is an exciting cliff to stand on.

Follow Dinah Thorpe on at www.dinahthorpe.com

 

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Margeaux Simms' New Music Video Prominently Features Androgynous Girlfriend http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/margeaux-simms-new-music-video-prominently-features-androgynous-girlfriend/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/margeaux-simms-new-music-video-prominently-features-androgynous-girlfriend/#respond Sun, 01 May 2016 15:23:57 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27619 Breakout star and former cast member of VH1’s Love & Hip Hop Atlanta (LHHATL), Margeaux Simms, recently debuted the video for her new single,...

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Breakout star and former cast member of VH1’s Love & Hip Hop Atlanta (LHHATL), Margeaux Simms, recently debuted the video for her new single, “Girl On the Left” featuring her equally stunning partner, androgynous model Merike Palmiste.

The Canadian-Jamaican, Margeaux Simms, began writing songs and performing at age 14 in her hometown of Toronto. In 2005, her group Test Drive, had a striking set of production by Timbaland, Danja Handz and The Runners along with DJ Khaled.

Margeaux ultimately self-released her solo EP Animal House in 2011. Joining other various electronic groups, and bands playing guitar, she eventually changed her moniker from Margo to Margeaux. She returned with a new sound and songs featuring production from various producers. The result of the production has been an ethereal crafting of electronic Hip Hop that evokes emotional swag with heavy drum beats and sultry vocals that embody who Margeaux is as an artist.

Her hit single “Start a War,” which was released in 2015 on her HOFM label and debuted on Love & Hip Hop Atlanta, has created great anticipation among music geeks from Toronto to Brooklyn to Japan and is the prelude for her forthcoming EP, Blue Cocaine, which will be released later this year.

Merika also has an impressive resume. Signed to Major Models, Merika has landed major gigs modeling for successful designers and has been featured on the runway at Brooklyn Museum for two consecutive years.

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Style Dossier: Naa Akua http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/style-dossier-naa-akua/ http://www.dapperq.com/2016/05/style-dossier-naa-akua/#respond Sun, 01 May 2016 04:00:55 +0000 http://www.dapperq.com/?p=27611 Welcome back to Style Dossier, Gabrielle Royal’s column that profiles stylish queers across the country. For her latest edition of Style Dossier, Gabrielle is...

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Welcome back to Style Dossier, Gabrielle Royal’s column that profiles stylish queers across the country. For her latest edition of Style Dossier, Gabrielle is celebrating the style of Naa Akua, a spoken word artist and emcee from Mount Vernon, now residing in the Bronx, New York. Naa prefers the pronouns: she, her, them, they.

Gabrielle: Who is your biggest fashion icon and why?

Naa: Funny thing is, I don't I have a fashion icon that's known! As I got older, I do remember looking at black and white pictures of my grandfather that impressed me. I wanted to follow his look and his style. My grandfather gave me the desire to wear suits and hats and look fly.

Gabrielle: How much of your personal style is influenced by your identity?

Naa: When I was young, I always wanted to wear jeans and sneakers and most of the time borrow my father's shirts and button downs. Everyone labeled me a tomboy, but I just saw it as me being comfortable. That comfort never changed as I got older. However, now I am able to say who I am. I am two spirited, though I am not of Native American descent. I feel I carry the balance of masculine and feminine energy. So my style expresses the comfort I have with both energies.

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Gabrielle: Why is queer visibility important and how does fashion help create space for members of our community?

Naa: I feel queer visibility is important because many of us -  whether young, middle aged, or in the golden years -  are still afraid to come out (and I know it's for many reasons). Talking to someone who just came out to their parents last year, the process is real, but the outcome, no matter what, is a meaningful one. I believe fashion creates a space to express such visibility. Fashion is the answer to your question, “Well, how do I feel today?" It allows you and many others to experience your mood or feeling. I believe fashion within the LGBTQ community gives us a chance to all have a voice.

Gabrielle: What challenges do you face in your profession, if any, as an LGBTQ person?

Naa: I see my life as a learning experience and everyone can choose if they like to learn with me. So I won't say that I see challenges as an LGBTQ person. I see more opportunities to learn and teach. Whether I'm on stage performing, working with youth, or talking to co-workers about everyday life, all will get a chance to see that we are not that different from each other.

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Gabrielle: Tell us about your biggest fashion and/or shopping fail.

Naa: Biggest fashion fail: turquoise wrestling boots. I'm not too sure why I thought that was a good idea!

Gabrielle: What advice would you give our readership? What advice can you offer to people who fit outside of society's understanding of traditionally masculine and feminine styles?

Naa: When you know it, you own it. Now you’re not making a statement, you’re just being you. So, no matter who sees you, they will respect the confidence that you carry and the clothes that adorn it.

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Gabrielle: Tell us something unique about yourself.

Naa: What I find unique about myself is that I truly feel I have the ability to create a space for people to feel comfortable and to connect with me on a human to human level.

Gabrielle: How did you hear about dapperQ? Why were you interested in a feature?

Naa: I heard about dapperQ through the great world of Instagram. I became interested in becoming a feature when I saw myself in every picture and story I had seen. I was one of many who were searching for visibility.

Want more Naa? Follow on social media:
Instagram : @naa_accepts
Facebook: Naa Akua
Soundcloud: Naa Akua

Photos by Jeanesque Photography

The post Style Dossier: Naa Akua appeared first on dapperQ.

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